North Bay Public Library, Audio-Visual Departement (North Bay, Canada)

The audio-visual departement of the North Bay Public Library (in North Bay, Ontario) uses a different stamp than other departements. This stamp is placed on a dummy for a CD. It includes the whole adress of the library and the name of the departement, which is a lot of information compared to the books, which are just stamped with the name of the library.

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Toronto Public Library, Beaches Branch (Toronto, Kanada)

This is a stamp by the “Beaches” branch of the Toronto Public Library which represents a stark contrast between the “policy of library stamps” in different library systems. The stamp is placed on the outside of the repective book, so you could read it “from above”. This is common in different library systems, e.g. in canada. Probably every canadian library does it this way. In other countries, libraries would never do that, e.g. Germany or Siwitzerland (or, if they do, it is a rare exception).

Temagami Public Library

Temagami is a settlement with less than 1000 inhabitants in the middle of Ontario, Canada, surrounded by lakes and woods. But still with post office, local stores and a – not so small – public library. The stamp of this library is rather simple, just the name in a simple font, all caps.

At least until some years, the library used date due slips (printed not in Canada, but the US).

Schulbibliothekarische Arbeitsstelle Frankfurt am Main [1] (Frankfurt, Germany)

This is amazing: The “Schulbibliothekarische Arbeitsstelle Frankfurt am Main” (school-librarian department Frankfurt am Main) in Germany is a departement, situated in the public library of the city, charged with the task to support every school library in the city (more than 200 schools, not all with a library). On thing the department does is purchasing the books the schools have selected, then outfitting and cataloging them, before sendig them to the schools. For this the departemend has a stamp for every school library it supports.

So, those are all those stamps, nearly 200 of them. The beauty of stamps…

Gemeindebibliothek Zeuthen (Zeuthen, Germany)

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A very simple stamp by the “Gemeindebibliothek Zeuthen” (community library of Zeuthen), the public library of the smaller city of Zeuthen, in the agglomeration area of Berlin (Germany). Just the name of the library, which consists of the function of the library and its city. No more ornament. Interestingly the word “Gemeindebibliothek” is a little bit bigger than the name of the town.

Universitätsbibliothek Basel (Swizerland)

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This (older) stamp by the university library of Basel, Switzerland, uses an traditional style for library stamps, the circle with the name of the library as corona, but with noticeable graphic elements. The center of the stamp is taken by the logo of the city and canton of Basel (as well as the canton of Baselland), an stylized crosier of a bishop. The institutional name (university library) is separated from the name of the city and canton (Basel) by two stars. Those two stars seemed to be picked from a typewriter; something that seems old-fashined today, but not at the time (the book with the stamp was published in 1986). They are faint reminiscents of snowflakes as well.

 

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The black ink leads includes the stamp in most of the publications in such a way that they seem to be part of the title page. The stamp can be overlooked quite simply, contary to the signature, done with lead pencil

Art Gallery of Ontario, Reference Library (Toronto, Canada)

The Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada, maintains a reference library (including an artists archive) as well, which is open to the public. The library uses this simple stamp, quite often with an ink (as here) which does not fit well with the special paper used in art publications.

The Art Gallery of Ontario in Toronto, Canada, maintains a reference library (including an artists archive) as well, which is open to the public. The library uses this simple stamp, quite often with an ink (as here) which does not fit well with the special paper used in art publications.

 

The stamp itself is a circle, highlighting not the name of the Gallery (which is used as corona), but of the library. The meaning of the star at the bottom of the stamp is not apparent.

The stamp itself is a circle, highlighting not the name of the Gallery (which is used as corona), but of the library. The meaning of the star at the bottom of the stamp is not apparent.

 

Besides the round ink stamp, the library contains books from other libraries, which used other stamps, like this embosser.

Besides the round ink stamp, the library contains books from other libraries, which used other stamps, like this embosser.

Ullstein GmbH Archiv u Bibliothek (Berlin, Germany)

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Ullstein is one of the most important publishing houses in german history. Founded in 1877 it played an important role in the newspaper-market in the early 20th century, and as a modern publishing house of fiction for the mass market. (The house still exists today, but not with the same relevance.) There was also an “archive and library” (Archiv u. Bibliothek), were this book stood ones, apparently in the 1960s.

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The stamp consists of two parts/stamps. One, on the bottom, is just a the name of the institution, highlighting “Ullstein” in a bold font, and the amendment GmbH (limited liability company) and the name of the institution in the publishing house. The style and the blue ink suggests a administrative act more than a library (like a running number stamp on a file). The stamp above, with it’s bold, black border and it’s demineering appearance, on the other hand, creates the impression of a confident institution. It includes a space for the signature of the book (which, by this system, can not really be changed anymore). It is a really seldom used system of library stamps.

Bibliothèques Publiques Annecy (Annecy, France)

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Annecy is a small (50.000 inhabitants) village in the far east of France, near Switzerland and Italy; it’s public library is placed in a distinctively 70/80s-french socialdemocratic-urbanisation scheme building, with serveral floors and quite a lot of space, which is used very extensive by the inhabitants. The library stamp, however, points to a very restrained and lucid style.

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It’s just the name of the library (Public Library) in a clear circle, highlighting the name of the town. The black ink let the stamp kind of “disappear” on most of the book titles.

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The library houses an “Arthotheque” (library for artworks), but under the name “bibliothèque municipale Annecy” (municipale as in govermantal area, which includes more that the city itself). This stamp differs from the other one in that it highlights the name of the commune of Annecy by placing it in the middle and circle the name of the library all around the circle.

Kantonsbibliothek Baselland, Liestal (Switzerland)

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The “Kantonsbibliothek Baselland” – state library of the canton of Basel-Country (which is not the city of Basel, but a canton in its own right) – uses the official emblem of it’s canton. However, in this stamp the emblem isn’t the center, but seems to be surrounded by the margin. This margin looks like a ring, that encloses the emblem itself. The name of the library seems more important than the emblem.

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This stamp is a good exemple for the different effect of the same ink und stamp on different paper. While in the first picture, the stamp looks brightened, this one looks like it does not really interact with the paper. One can get the impression that you can still erase the stamp simply by wipe over it (which is not the case).